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Archive for the ‘linux’ Category

MKVToolNix 45.0.0 for Slackware x64

April 18th, 2020 No comments

 

Yet again a newer version of the MKVToolnix package for Slackware (Sbo build). This one was build on a Slackware-current system. Requires Qt5.

 
For Slackware-curent x64:

 

Enjoy 🙂
 

Categories: linux, matroska, mkvtoolnix, slackpkg, slackware Views: 30

MKVToolNix 8.3.0 for Slackware x64

December 28th, 2015 No comments

 

Yet again a newer version of the MKVToolnix package for Slackware (Sbo build). This one was build on a 14.1 system. Note that this is also the last version that uses the wxWidgets library for the mkvmerge GUI tool (mmg). Newer versions apparently will rely on Qt5. However, Qt5 is not part of a standard Slackware 14.1 system.

 
For Slackware 14.1 x64:

 

Enjoy 🙂
 

Categories: linux, matroska, mkvtoolnix, slackpkg, slackware Views: 405

MKVToolNix 7.9.0 for Slackware x64

September 21st, 2015 No comments

 

Long time since I updated this one, but here is a newer version of the MKVToolnix package for Slackware (Sbo build).

 
For Slackware 14.1 x64:

 

Enjoy 🙂
 

Categories: linux, matroska, mkvtoolnix, slackpkg, slackware Views: 340

Fix your wifi card being blocked after booting (Linux 3.10.x)

December 25th, 2013 No comments

 

The problem

 
After upgrading an old laptop (HP nc8430) to a kernel from the 3.10 series, everything seemed to work fine, except for my wifi card (Atheros AR5418 Wireless Network Adapter [AR5008E 802.11(a)bgn]). Contrary to the previous kernels, after booting, the wifi led was dead, and I obviously had no connection with my wifi station. At first sight, I tried the wifi radio button, but that didn’t help, the wifi led stayed dead. Wicd could not find an active adapter.

 

Analyse this

 
When I ran lsmod , it showed me that all the required modules (the ath9k driver for the wifi adapter, wifi networking, 802.11, …) were loaded. When I ran iwconfig, it even showed me a wlan0 device, albeit not connected of course. WTF is going on ?

 Ok, let’s see what rfkill says:

rfkill list

I got a surprise: everything was blocked. I also have no idea why, but rfkill now showed me two wifi options: hp_wmi and phy0. I am pretty sure the hp_wmi thingie was never there before. Both of them were blocked (hard and soft), so I unblocked them:

rfkill unblock all

Now when I ran wicd-client, it connected to my wifi station. The wifi led come on as well. Good, but now, how do we fix this permanently ?

 

Solution

 
It appears that the hp_wmi module (support for some HP keys) does not play well with the rfkill module (RFKill is a linux kernel subsystem that provides an interface through which radio transmitters in a computer can be queried, activated, and deactivated).
So, a simple fix is to prevent the hp_wmi module from loading. On a Slackware 14.0 system, this can be achieved by creating a hp_wmi.conf file, in /etc/modprobe.d/, containing the following:

##############################################################################
# Do not edit this file; instead, copy it to /etc/modprobe.d/ and edit that
##############################################################################

# Blacklist because interferes with wifi (wifi rf blocked at boot) 
blacklist hp_wmi

 
This solves my problem: the wifi card now works again straight after booting, just like it did before. If you’re facing the same problem, let me know if this fix also works for you.
  

Categories: hardware, hp_wmi, linux, rfkill, wifi Views: 471

Tell Samba to shut up about CUPS

July 29th, 2013 No comments

 

The problem

 
Lately, I stumbled upon a minor but annoying issue with Samba on one of my file servers. There are no printers installed on this server, and probably never will be. However, smbd complains to no end in the client logfiles about not being able to connect to a CUPS server:
 

[david@Samba ~]$ head /var/log/samba.dfpc5
...
[2013/07/23 07:49:24.869727,  0] printing/print_cups.c:109(cups_connect)
  Unable to connect to CUPS server localhost:631 - Connection refused
[2013/07/23 07:49:24.869790,  0] printing/print_cups.c:468(cups_async_callback)
  failed to retrieve printer list: NT_STATUS_UNSUCCESSFUL
...

 
All of the client logfiles were spammed continously by Samba with these lines. While this did not seem to harm the performance of the server, I wanted to ged rid of them. After all, I never configured this Samba server to use CUPS, so why the hell is it trying to find one ?
 

The cause

 
This file server runs Slackware Linux, and the Samba package provided by Slackware, is compiled with – – enable-cups (like it is on most distros). Consequently, unless you tell it otherwise, Samba uses CUPS as the default printing system and tries to connect to a local CUPS server. And if fails to do so, it starts spamming your log files . . .

 

The solution

 

There are several solutions to this problem:

  • reconfigure your Samba installation not to use CUPS
  • recompile the Samba package without CUPS support
  • run CUPS anyway on that server so Samba can connect to it

 
I prefer the 1st solution. Just edit your smb.conf file, and look for the line that says “printing = cups”. Pay attention to the ; character at the front, which actually commnents out this line. You must remove the ; character.

 

;   printing = cups

 printing = bsd

 
Save the file and restart the Samba service. Those pesky CUPS lines in your logfiles should be history.
 

Categories: CUPS, linux, samba, slackware Views: 369

Remote Desktop tricks for Linux users

January 7th, 2013 No comments

 

If you like to make RDP connections to Windows machines from your Linux box, it is often convenient if you can set a few things right from the start. As such, I wrote a little shell script around rdesktop, in order to make life somewhat easier for me.
 
This script does the following:

  • invoke rdesktop
  • set the keyboard layout to Belgian AZERTY
  • set the screen resolution to something that fits the screen of my laptop
  • map a local directory so it is available on the remote Windows box

 

And here is the script:

#!/bin/bash
#-----------------------------------------
# simple wrapper for rdesktop
# set keyb layout on server to azerty BE
# set window size to 1370x840
#-----------------------------------------

 if [ $# != "0" ] ;
 then

   rdesktop -k nl-be  -r 'disk:homedrv=/home/david/' -g 1370x840  $1

 else
   echo "$0: No arguments were supplied. Please supply a valid target 
             hostname or IP address."
   exit 1
 fi

 exit 0

 

The script must be invoked with one arument, the hostname or IP adress of the machine you want to connect to. I guess the script is simple enough to understand what it does. Adapt it to your particular needs, and I hope you like it.

Categories: linux, rdesktop, RDP, script Views: 478